Monday, May 08, 2006

The End of A Flasher's Dozen

I have two major health problems that will not allow me to complete and publish The Summer Issue of A Flasher’s Dozen. Nor can I see any hope for producing future issues. Therefore, I am calling it quits and will begin making refunds to paid subscribers next week.

It's possible that I might try to produce a smaller, electronic version, so, if you're interested in submitting something, please check back in a few weeks for further details.

Sunday, April 02, 2006

Submissions for the Summer Issue

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The deadline for The Summer Issue has come and gone.

We’ve received forty-six submissions, but, due in large part to my illness, we’ve only responded to twenty-three of them so far. The thing that worries me the most is that we will only have room for about seventeen stories in The Summer Issue, and that means we will have to release quite a few pieces just because there won’t be room for them!

We have not accepted anything for The Summer Issue yet; however, we’ve made editorial suggestions to several of the authors, and they’ve resubmitted their work in light of our suggestions—we hope! These resubmissions also need to be reviewed.

So there’s a lot of work ahead of us, and we hope you'll be patient if our progress is a bit glacial.

Wednesday, February 22, 2006

Summer Issue Guidelines and Subscription Information

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The Spring Issue of A Flasher’s Dozen has been printed and should be into the mail by March 1st; annual subscribers will also receive The Lone Flasher: “My ‘Flash’ Abecedary” by William Naylor, a collection of 55-ers, each beginning with a different letter of the alphabet. So now it’s time to start looking forward to The Summer Issue.

Submissions to A Flasher’s Dozen may be fiction or memoir in any genre or combination of genres; they may be cleverly surreal or humorously absurd; they may even be prose poetry. But they MUST contain the basic narrative elements, and they must display some form of wit -- cleverness, paradox, subtlety, irony, epiphany, or even enigmas gift-wrapped in conundrums. And they must contain between 55 and 999 words. No one should submit more than one piece per issue.

Each submission should be pasted into an e-mail and sent to krm6343@yahoo.com
The Subject Line should read Summer Issue: "Your Story Title".

Deadlines are:
04/1/06 (for the Summer Issue)
07/1/06 (for the Autumn issue)
10/1/06 (for the Winter Issue)
01/1/07 (for the Spring Issue)

Each subscriber whose work is published will receive a check for $15, an extra copy of the issue in which the work appears, and a one-issue subscription extension. Non-subscribers will receive two copies of the issue in which their work appear. An annual subscription is $15 for four issues (plus $8 postage for non-residents of the US). Subscriptions may be paid through PayPal to krm6343@yahoo.com or by check payable to KR Mullin, PO Box 112, Mantua, NJ 08051-0112. Annual subscriptions to A Flasher’s Dozen also include copies of The Lone Flasher--collections of works by a single author.

Because The Summer Issue will officially be The Fourth Issue, stories about Quarters or Quarter Horses, the Fourth Amendment or the Fourth of July, or even Quartz will be particularly welcome though not required.

Works containing gratuitous violence, prurient sex, or censorable language should be submitted elsewhere.

Authors must include: (1) a mailing address and (2) a brief biography (including website information, if desired) to be published in the issue. Also, non-subscribers must state that they realize they'll only receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears.

Please do not send material that has been submitted or published elsewhere. All rights revert to the author after publication.

Sunday, January 15, 2006

Spring Issue: All 18 Titles, Authors and Opening Lines

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Agony in the Lab (596 words) by Stephen Thompson (PA)
“How big a capacitor do we need?”
“That’s a good question Henry,” Amanda flips through the manual and re-reads the schematic. “One micro-Farad.” Getting very close she asks, “Want me to get one?”

Ain't It the Truth (453 words) by Patricia Harrington (WA)
Mama used to say, "A penny saved, is worth every cent." Must have been true, cuz when Mama passed two years ago this spring, she had enough to bury her decent-like.

Church of the Holy Triad (495 words) by Pam Skochinski (CA)
Jessica had the voice of an angel and the body of a goddess, attributes that had quickly attracted both the attention and affection of my husband, The Reverend Marcus Banks.

Flat-Liner (291 words) by Suzanne Karg (PA)
He quickly checked her pulse and peered into her face. Nothing. Discoloration around her eyes spoke of a recent painful encounter. Another flat-liner, so typical of this time of year.

Gone Wrong (105 words) by Sandra Seamans (PA)
“What could go wrong, Buck?”

Hegfoot Knows Best (99 words) by KR Mullin (NJ)
Don’t miss the re-run of this episode from 1955 in which Betty (Elinor Donahue) joins the after-school knitting club, and Bud (Billy Gray) decides to raise sheep in the back yard to make money for a jalopy.

I’ll Take Care of It (397 words) by Bruce Niedt (NJ)
All the evidence against Bobby had been circumstantial – his circular saw, his wife’s headless torso in the lake, the traces of blood and hair on his carpet. But that day on the stand, his former lover put him away.

Last Chance for Romance (495 words) by Diana Woods (CA)
It's so easy, Frieda thought as she clicked herself into cyberspace. Within minutes her photo would post on the Last Chance website. She'd picked an image from ten years ago when she still had color in her hair. Cheating, some might say. But her heart still throbbed with the passion of a younger woman.

Lunch with Flora (523 words) by Sharon Poppen (AZ)
"Here she comes, Herb. I’m taking my break." Jerry laid his apron next to the cash register, ran his fingers through his hair and walked to the door.

The Night of Three Shadows (630 words) by Darryl Brooks (GA)
Gjinn was going to the beheading block at the rising of the third moon -- no appeal, no reprieve, and no stay of execution. The crime they convicted him of was simple – disrespect. He had failed to keep his head bowed as a Leonar oppressor had passed on the street.

Principles for Hire (598 words) by Ann Vitale (PA)
I’d been waiting twenty minutes when the three of them lock-stepped into the bar, so close they could have been fused. When I’d called Tri-Simian to hire a private investigator, they said they worked best together, so I got the trio, at no little expense.

Rough Beginnings (995 words) by Jackie Vick (CA)
Julie Weber absentmindedly scratched her cheek, leaving behind a trail of flour. She popped a pan of cherry turnovers into the oven and reached for her list. 7. Never cook cherries. She crossed the item off with a triumphant flourish.

Salat Days (940 words) by Michael R. Burch (TN)
As a young boy growing up on the outskirts of Nashville, I was baffled by the not-so-obvious attractions of "poke salat," a turnipy green my Grandpa Burch pursued "like a blue tic tailin' a coon."

A Third of Nothing (275 words) by Margaret B. Davidson (NY)
Given the character of his relatives, the best Bertram could hope for was that he'd be left to die alone. Such fortune was to elude him.

Three in the Road (181 words) by Aaron Sinkovich (PA)
About the time Samantha was to be weaned from her bedtime pacifier—better known as the "bink"—the family had a run of bad luck. Their beloved cat Barney was killed on a nearby road. The next week their second cat Blacky suffered the same fate. The

Toothbrush Symphony (601 words) by Bob Brill (MI)
As I sat in the concert hall listening to the music, I noticed that the conductor was directing the orchestra with a toothbrush.

A Victim of the Crash (460 words) by E. N. Taylor (Australia)
So the plan is you drop in front of a car, just as it's leaving the intersection. It don't have much chance to build up speed, so it don't knock you around too bad.

We're Going to Disneyland! (550 words) by Wayne Scheer (GA)
YOUR SERVICES ARE NO LONGER REQUIRED. The six words were all in caps and bold print, as if to taunt him.

Saturday, January 07, 2006

The First Week of January ROCKS !!!

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John Young published a GREAT interview about A Flasher’s Dozen in the January issue of Flash Fiction Flash (To subscribe: send a blank e-mail to FlashFictionFlash-subscribe@yahoogroups.com) His interview opened the door for a number of sparkling opportunities, including an invitation from Mary Rosenblum (www.maryrosenblum.com) to do a live interview at the Long Ridge Writers Group Website (www.longridgewritersgroup.com) on March 9th; I, of course, said yes. Then Mary--who has probably never heard the word “procrastination”--listed AFD on her New Market Updates. And, between those two sources, I’ve suddenly received three new subscribers and four submissions to The Summer Issue--The Spring Issue deadline having passed a few days before Flash Fiction Flash hit the virtual newsstand. Nor did the invitations stop there! I also received an invitation from Kirsty Davies (www.professionalpolishing.co.uk) to put a Call for Submissions on the www.slingink.co.uk writer’s website.

Meanwhile, we haven’t quite finished responding to authors who submitted work for The Spring Issue yet. That process was interrupted because I wanted to get the mock-ups of accepted pieces into the mail for author approval before the postage rates went up. So I sent five out this morning with $.37 on the outside and $.39 on the SASE. As soon as those texts have been approved by their authors, I’ll be publishing the opening paragraphs on the website. Interestingly, all five are subscribers, and they’re from five different states: CA, MI, NJ, NY, and PA.

Monday, January 02, 2006

Spring Submissions at the Deadline

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We only received 25 submissions for The Spring Issue--5 from PA; 4 CA; 3 GA; 2 NJ; and 11 from elsewhere, including England and Australia. Thirteen submissions came from subscribers; 12 from non-subscribers. We have reviewed 17 of the texts; so far, we've suggested edits to 13 and released four back to their authors, all four releases had come from non-subscribers. Nine of the thirteen authors have edited and resubmitted their manuscripts.

Sunday, December 11, 2005

Banner Week for Our Publications

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The week started with promise: John Young conducted an e-nterview with me for the January Issue of Flash Fiction Flash. This will come out after 1/1, however, so it won’t do much to increase submissions for The Spring Issue. So far we’ve only received 15 submissions for that issue, and we’ve already released one of those. Hardly an adequate pool for publishing seventeen pieces, is it? Four of the seven pieces that arrived this week came from previously published authors, and it makes me worry that potential authors will notice the recurrence of author’s names in each issue and think that we’re like those snobbish little cliques that I so greatly despised in high school. Tain’t so, folks! Send us something appropriate, and we’ll add you to our growing list of authors. So far in A Flasher’s Dozen, we’ve published 49 stories by 36 authors from 13 states and 6 places outside the United States.

Also, we received two very welcome documents this week: first was the Certificate of Registration for the Copyright on The Autumn Issue, but, more importantly, we’ve finally received an ISSN number for The Lone Flasher, which means we’ll be able to distribute that publication through bookstores! I immediately wrote to the National Serials Data Program requesting information about the status of A Flasher’s Dozen, for which we’d requested an ISSN almost three months before requesting the Lone Flasher ISSN.

Sunday, December 04, 2005

The Last Winter Issue Update

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Copies of The Winter Issue have been mailed to our authors, our subscribers, and all the people who were facing the Open Mike when I took the cover photo! Also I’ll be sending sample copies out to some well-known authors on the off chance that they or one of their students might be interested in subscribing or submitting something to us.

Our annual subscribers also received copies of The Lone Flasher: “Knights and Dames,” Sandra Seaman’s delightful tales from days of noir when knights were bold and dames were dangerous!

Now we’re about to start reviewing the eight submissions we’ve already received for The Spring Issue--two from CA, and one each from FL, GA, MA, NC, NJ, and London.

Sunday, November 20, 2005

Latest Subscription and Submission Guidelines

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An annual subscription is $15 for four issues (plus $8 postage for non-residents of the US). We also offer a “Next Issue” Subscription for $5.00 (plus $2 postage for non-residents). Subscriptions may be paid through PayPal to krm6343@yahoo.com or by check payable to KR Mullin, PO Box 112, Mantua, NJ 08051-0112.

Annual subscriptions to A Flasher’s Dozen also include copies of The Lone Flasher -- collections of works by a single author. Accompanying The Winter Issue is Sandra Seamans’ “Knights and Dames” -- a collection of Buck and Irma stories from days of noir when knights were bold and dames were deadly. Accompanying the Spring Issue will be a collection of Will Naylor’s 55ers. If you’d like to start your annual subscription with The Autumn Issue, we’ll include a copy of KR Mullin’s “Not Quite Your Same Old Eden” -- a collection of stories about Adam, Eve, Snake and ... Grandmother?

Submissions to A Flasher’s Dozen may be fiction or memoir in any genre or combination of genres; they may be cleverly surreal or humorously absurd; they may even be prose poetry. But they must contain narrative elements, and they must display some form of wit -- cleverness, paradox, subtlety, irony, epiphany, or even enigmas gift-wrapped in conundrums; and they must contain between 99 and 999 words. No one should submit more than one piece per issue. "Next Issue" subscribers may submit one piece before receiving the issue and another piece after receiving the issue.

Each submission should be pasted into an e-mail and sent to krm6343@yahoo.com
The Subject Line should read Spring Issue: Your Story Title.

Deadlines are:
01/1/06 (for the Spring Issue)
04/1/06 (for the Summer Issue)
07/1/06 (for the Autumn issue)
10/1/06 (for the Winter Issue)

Each subscriber whose work is published will receive a check for $15, an extra copy of the issue in which the work appears, and a one-issue subscription extension. Non-subscribers will receive two copies of the issue in which their work appear.

Because The Spring Issue will officially be The Third Issue, stories about Third Wheels, Triplets, or Trios will be particularly welcome though not required.

Works containing gratuitous violence, prurient sex, or censorable language should be submitted elsewhere.

Authors must include: (1) a mailing address and (2) a brief biography (including website information, if desired) to be published in the issue. Also, non-subscribers must state that they realize they'll only receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears.

Please do not send material that has been submitted or published elsewhere. All rights revert to the author after publication.

Sunday, November 13, 2005

Opening Lines for All 17 Winter-Issue Stories

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1. Happy New Year by Judy Thomas of Georgia (240 words)
For the hundredth time Julia made up her mind that this was the last time he would have the chance to break a promise to her.

2. Overcoming Debbie Gilroy by Wayne Scheer of Georgia (910 words)
The ghost of Debbie Gilroy peered over Andy Mueller’s shoulder as he stared at the business card where he’d scrawled Nancy Gomez’s phone number.

3. Monica’s Second Time by Heather Wardell of Ontario (167 words)
I’m lying on the bed, wearing a brand new white silk nightgown, waiting for him to arrive.

4. Ezra by Joseph DeRepentigny of Georgia (425 words)
Ezra did not feel well. His eyesight was blurry, and his joints ached. Nor did he want to do anything except lie down and rest. Therefore, going to the doctor’s office took a lot of effort.

5. Second-Hand Rose by William B. Naylor of Nova Scotia (55 words)
“He buy you flowers?”

6. Educated Selection by Sharon Poppen of Arizona (680 words)
“I may be old fashioned,” Grandma said to her great grandkids, “but ...”

7. Secondhand Shoe by Patricia Harrington of Washington (324 words)
“She has such cold eyes. Whatever do you see in her?“

8. The Mulberry Street Horsefly Calamity by Diane McAnulty of Pennsylvania (790 words)
I was cuddled up with a magazine article on the medicinal use of leeches, finally getting a little midnight-in-July breeze from the open window, when a fly landed on my right shoulder.

9. Size Doesn’t Matter by Stephen L. Thompson of Pennsylvania (92 words)
Winter had moved in like an annoying neighbor, and Jason had had enough.

10. Lone Survivor of Flight #13 by Diana Woods of California (733 words)
As I settled onto my personal flotation cushion, I wondered if I'd made the right decision. For weeks, I had agonized over risking my life on this flight, but I yearned to smell the powdery sweet skin of my newborn granddaughter.

11. Smile Right Line by Darren Todd of Arizona (645 words)
“Bo gives a toothbrush to every girl he talks to,” I explained to the bewildered girl who had just joined us in the Burger Chef parking lot.

12. The Bicycle Man by Mariel DiSibio of New Jersey (765 words)
The Bicycle Man was sitting on the curb in front of his father’s drugstore, sobbing, face in his hands.

13. The Writer’s Flea Market by A Collaboration (of two authors and an editor) (240 words)
“I'm looking for a muse,” I told the vendor.

14. Competitive Edge by Darren Swift of Caerphilly, Wales (545 words)
“John felt good. Really good. This was the day they'd been working toward. This would be their day. The culmination of a year's practice.”

15. Houdini Bound in Chains by K. Lawson Gilbert of Pennsylvania (860 words)
“The kitchen felt unusually cold for a summer morning. I ground coffee beans, while filling the water chamber of the coffee maker. I looked forward to that first aroma of java, but instead, an unpleasant odor bunched heavily around me.”

16. Open Door Policy by Pam Skochinski of California (265 words)
Through three regimes, I’ve been the manager here at Tomich Manufacturing. With each regime change, policies changed but the job, it stayed the same.

17. Snake Eyes for the New Guise by KR Mullin of New Jersey (465 words)
One day Adam went to Snake’s favorite basking stone and found him stretched out in the sun, apparently sleeping.