Sunday, December 11, 2005

Banner Week for Our Publications

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The week started with promise: John Young conducted an e-nterview with me for the January Issue of Flash Fiction Flash. This will come out after 1/1, however, so it won’t do much to increase submissions for The Spring Issue. So far we’ve only received 15 submissions for that issue, and we’ve already released one of those. Hardly an adequate pool for publishing seventeen pieces, is it? Four of the seven pieces that arrived this week came from previously published authors, and it makes me worry that potential authors will notice the recurrence of author’s names in each issue and think that we’re like those snobbish little cliques that I so greatly despised in high school. Tain’t so, folks! Send us something appropriate, and we’ll add you to our growing list of authors. So far in A Flasher’s Dozen, we’ve published 49 stories by 36 authors from 13 states and 6 places outside the United States.

Also, we received two very welcome documents this week: first was the Certificate of Registration for the Copyright on The Autumn Issue, but, more importantly, we’ve finally received an ISSN number for The Lone Flasher, which means we’ll be able to distribute that publication through bookstores! I immediately wrote to the National Serials Data Program requesting information about the status of A Flasher’s Dozen, for which we’d requested an ISSN almost three months before requesting the Lone Flasher ISSN.

Sunday, December 04, 2005

The Last Winter Issue Update

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Copies of The Winter Issue have been mailed to our authors, our subscribers, and all the people who were facing the Open Mike when I took the cover photo! Also I’ll be sending sample copies out to some well-known authors on the off chance that they or one of their students might be interested in subscribing or submitting something to us.

Our annual subscribers also received copies of The Lone Flasher: “Knights and Dames,” Sandra Seaman’s delightful tales from days of noir when knights were bold and dames were dangerous!

Now we’re about to start reviewing the eight submissions we’ve already received for The Spring Issue--two from CA, and one each from FL, GA, MA, NC, NJ, and London.

Sunday, November 20, 2005

Latest Subscription and Submission Guidelines

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An annual subscription is $15 for four issues (plus $8 postage for non-residents of the US). We also offer a “Next Issue” Subscription for $5.00 (plus $2 postage for non-residents). Subscriptions may be paid through PayPal to krm6343@yahoo.com or by check payable to KR Mullin, PO Box 112, Mantua, NJ 08051-0112.

Annual subscriptions to A Flasher’s Dozen also include copies of The Lone Flasher -- collections of works by a single author. Accompanying The Winter Issue is Sandra Seamans’ “Knights and Dames” -- a collection of Buck and Irma stories from days of noir when knights were bold and dames were deadly. Accompanying the Spring Issue will be a collection of Will Naylor’s 55ers. If you’d like to start your annual subscription with The Autumn Issue, we’ll include a copy of KR Mullin’s “Not Quite Your Same Old Eden” -- a collection of stories about Adam, Eve, Snake and ... Grandmother?

Submissions to A Flasher’s Dozen may be fiction or memoir in any genre or combination of genres; they may be cleverly surreal or humorously absurd; they may even be prose poetry. But they must contain narrative elements, and they must display some form of wit -- cleverness, paradox, subtlety, irony, epiphany, or even enigmas gift-wrapped in conundrums; and they must contain between 99 and 999 words. No one should submit more than one piece per issue. "Next Issue" subscribers may submit one piece before receiving the issue and another piece after receiving the issue.

Each submission should be pasted into an e-mail and sent to krm6343@yahoo.com
The Subject Line should read Spring Issue: Your Story Title.

Deadlines are:
01/1/06 (for the Spring Issue)
04/1/06 (for the Summer Issue)
07/1/06 (for the Autumn issue)
10/1/06 (for the Winter Issue)

Each subscriber whose work is published will receive a check for $15, an extra copy of the issue in which the work appears, and a one-issue subscription extension. Non-subscribers will receive two copies of the issue in which their work appear.

Because The Spring Issue will officially be The Third Issue, stories about Third Wheels, Triplets, or Trios will be particularly welcome though not required.

Works containing gratuitous violence, prurient sex, or censorable language should be submitted elsewhere.

Authors must include: (1) a mailing address and (2) a brief biography (including website information, if desired) to be published in the issue. Also, non-subscribers must state that they realize they'll only receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears.

Please do not send material that has been submitted or published elsewhere. All rights revert to the author after publication.

Sunday, November 13, 2005

Opening Lines for All 17 Winter-Issue Stories

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1. Happy New Year by Judy Thomas of Georgia (240 words)
For the hundredth time Julia made up her mind that this was the last time he would have the chance to break a promise to her.

2. Overcoming Debbie Gilroy by Wayne Scheer of Georgia (910 words)
The ghost of Debbie Gilroy peered over Andy Mueller’s shoulder as he stared at the business card where he’d scrawled Nancy Gomez’s phone number.

3. Monica’s Second Time by Heather Wardell of Ontario (167 words)
I’m lying on the bed, wearing a brand new white silk nightgown, waiting for him to arrive.

4. Ezra by Joseph DeRepentigny of Georgia (425 words)
Ezra did not feel well. His eyesight was blurry, and his joints ached. Nor did he want to do anything except lie down and rest. Therefore, going to the doctor’s office took a lot of effort.

5. Second-Hand Rose by William B. Naylor of Nova Scotia (55 words)
“He buy you flowers?”

6. Educated Selection by Sharon Poppen of Arizona (680 words)
“I may be old fashioned,” Grandma said to her great grandkids, “but ...”

7. Secondhand Shoe by Patricia Harrington of Washington (324 words)
“She has such cold eyes. Whatever do you see in her?“

8. The Mulberry Street Horsefly Calamity by Diane McAnulty of Pennsylvania (790 words)
I was cuddled up with a magazine article on the medicinal use of leeches, finally getting a little midnight-in-July breeze from the open window, when a fly landed on my right shoulder.

9. Size Doesn’t Matter by Stephen L. Thompson of Pennsylvania (92 words)
Winter had moved in like an annoying neighbor, and Jason had had enough.

10. Lone Survivor of Flight #13 by Diana Woods of California (733 words)
As I settled onto my personal flotation cushion, I wondered if I'd made the right decision. For weeks, I had agonized over risking my life on this flight, but I yearned to smell the powdery sweet skin of my newborn granddaughter.

11. Smile Right Line by Darren Todd of Arizona (645 words)
“Bo gives a toothbrush to every girl he talks to,” I explained to the bewildered girl who had just joined us in the Burger Chef parking lot.

12. The Bicycle Man by Mariel DiSibio of New Jersey (765 words)
The Bicycle Man was sitting on the curb in front of his father’s drugstore, sobbing, face in his hands.

13. The Writer’s Flea Market by A Collaboration (of two authors and an editor) (240 words)
“I'm looking for a muse,” I told the vendor.

14. Competitive Edge by Darren Swift of Caerphilly, Wales (545 words)
“John felt good. Really good. This was the day they'd been working toward. This would be their day. The culmination of a year's practice.”

15. Houdini Bound in Chains by K. Lawson Gilbert of Pennsylvania (860 words)
“The kitchen felt unusually cold for a summer morning. I ground coffee beans, while filling the water chamber of the coffee maker. I looked forward to that first aroma of java, but instead, an unpleasant odor bunched heavily around me.”

16. Open Door Policy by Pam Skochinski of California (265 words)
Through three regimes, I’ve been the manager here at Tomich Manufacturing. With each regime change, policies changed but the job, it stayed the same.

17. Snake Eyes for the New Guise by KR Mullin of New Jersey (465 words)
One day Adam went to Snake’s favorite basking stone and found him stretched out in the sun, apparently sleeping.

Monday, October 03, 2005

Update at The Winter Issue Deadline

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We received thirty-five submissions for The Winter Issue, and we’ve released five of them. We’ve sent 23 editorial suggestions so far; and we’ve accepted seven edited stories:

Happy New Year by Judy Thomas of Georgia
Size Doesn’t Matter by Stephen L. Thompson of Pennsylvania
Secondhand Shoe by Patricia Harrington of Washington
Overcoming Debbie Gilroy by Wayne Scheer of Georgia
The Writer’s Flea Market A Collaboration by two authors and an editor
Ezra by Joseph DeRepentigny of Georgia
Educated Selection by Sharon Poppen of Arizona

We expect to have all stories (about seventeen) selected by the November First deadline.

Sunday, September 18, 2005

Brief Update

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So far, we’ve only received twenty-two submissions for The Winter Issue; we’ve rejected three, sent editorial suggestions to thirteen, and accepted two:

Happy New Year by Judy Thomas of Georgia
Size Doesn’t Matter by Stephen L. Thompson of Pennsylvania

With the October First Deadline looming, we'd suggest you check the "New Subscriptions & Submissions Guidelines" entry to the left and send us some Flash Fiction, Flash Memoir, or some other kind of Flash Lit. A catchy title, an intriguing opener, one or more fascinating characters, and a mind-bending storyline will win us over ... write now!

Sunday, September 11, 2005

Big Week

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Not only did we respond to eight of the authors who submitted work to The Winter Issue, but we also sent out a dozen copies of The Autumn Issue to Creative Writing teachers in MFA programs around the country to solicit submissions from them or their students.

However, the most important event this week was learning that A Flasher’s Dozen has been listed on the writersmarket.com website and has already led to a submission. Look out literary world!

Thursday, September 08, 2005

Autumn Issue On Its Way

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It took a week to prepare and mail The Autumn Issue to our authors and subscribers as well as the Copyright Office. Copies went to eighteen states, Australia, Canada, Israel, and Wales. And everyone with a 1-year subscription also received a copy of The Lone Flasher containing 19 of my “Not Quite Your Same Old Eden” stories. And here’s what recipients are saying about them:

“This really is a delightful publication. I've read it cover to cover and really enjoyed the stories. Terrific job you're doing. Every tale is a good one.” -- PF

“I received my two books yesterday and I sat down and read both of them cover to cover this morning. My favorite was yours. It tickled me, I laughed, I cried and I was extremely pleased to see something like this done.” -- CC

“By the way, your "Editor's Critique" Rejection letter was one of the best rejections letters I have received. For me, it showed what Flash Fiction was really about. Thank you.” -- ES

Next, I’ll be sending samples of A Flasher’s Dozen to creative writing teachers at schools with MFA programs in Creative Writing to solicit submissions from them and their students.

We’ve already received twelve submissions for The Winter Issue, and I’ve forwarded these (stripped of identifying information) to my co-editor so that we can start discussing them during the next week.

Tuesday, August 30, 2005

Updated Subscription & Submission Guidelines

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Here's how to Subscribe and/or Submit your work to A Flasher's Dozen -- a 20-30 page quarterly chapbook containing 13-17 pieces of Flash Lit.


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An annual subscription is $15 for four issues (plus $8 postage for non-residents of the US). We also offer a Next Issue Subscription for $5.00 (plus $2 postage for non-residents). Beginning with The Autumn Issue, annual subscribers will also receive The Lone Flasher, a collection of Flash Lit by a single author. The Lone Flasher for Autumn is KR Mullin's "Not Quite Your Same Old Eden" - a collection of stories about Adam, Eve, Snake ... and Grandmother?

Subscriptions may be paid through PayPal to krm6343@yahoo.com or by check payable to KR Mullin, PO Box 112, Mantua, NJ 08051-0112.


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We pay $15 per published story for submissions from subscribers. Non-subscribers will be paid two copies of the issue in which their work appears. No one should submit more than one piece per issue. "Next Issue" subscribers may submit one piece before receiving the issue and another piece after receiving the issue.

The submission should be pasted into an e-mail and sent to krm6343@yahoo.com

The Subject Line should read Winter Issue: Your Story Title.

Deadlines are:
10/1/05 (for the Winter Issue)
01/1/06 (for the Spring Issue)
04/1/06 (for the Summer Issue)
07/1/06 (for the Autumn issue)

Each subscriber whose work is published will receive a check for $15, an extra copy of the issue in which the work appears, and a one-issue subscription extension.

Submissions may be fiction or memoir in any genre or combination of genres; they may be cleverly surreal or humorously absurd; they may even be prose poetry. But they must contain narrative elements, and they must display some form of wit -- cleverness, paradox, subtlety, irony, epiphany, or even enigmas gift-wrapped in conundrums.

Because The Winter Issue will officially be The Second Issue, stories about Seconds, Second-hand Items, or Second Sight will be particularly welcome though not required.

Works containing gratuitous violence, prurient sex, or censorable language should be submitted elsewhere.

Submissions must contain between 55 and 999 words. Authors must include: (1) a mailing address and (2) a brief biography to be published in the issue (including personal website information if desired). Also, non-subscribers must state that they realize they'll only receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears.

Please do not send material that has been submitted or published elsewhere. All rights revert to the author after publication.

Friday, August 26, 2005

Cover + Contents = The Autumn Issue

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Because I wanted to put a photograph on the cover of this issue of A Flasher’s Dozen, I decided that I should have the cover printed professionally. And I decided to get 500 copies on the off chance that I’d be able to distribute most of them. Everything was in place except for the ISSN number.

There’s a terrific section in one of the Hornblower novels where Horatio has to decide when to stop salvaging gold and make his safe getaway. Well, I thought of that episode while I waited for the ISSN number to arrive. Unfortunately, I couldn’t keep waiting either, so I had to print the cover without the number.

I had a similar problem with The Lone Flasher, a collection of my Eden stories which will be sent to annual subscribers with The Autumn Issue. I’d been to an “art in the street” show in July and had seen a piece of artwork relating to the Garden of Eden. It was by an artist whose work we’d purchased in the past, so I asked him if I could use a detail from the print on the cover of Not Quite Your Same Old Eden, and he said that I could. He gave me his address, and I sent him a mock-up of the cover along with A Flasher’s Agreement in early July.I waited for him to return it as long as I could and then found another image for the cover.

Once the covers were at the printers, I began copying the contents and folding the pages. That’s when the copy machine started acting up, and the little red lights went on to indicate that I was rapidly running out of toner, so I had to replace the toner cartridge (over $150). Then I picked up the covers (almost $300). And tomorrow I’ll be sending checks to my authors (over $250). Then the cost of postage and copyright and . . .

Sunday, August 07, 2005

The Autumn Issue is about to Fall

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Because A Flasher’s Dozen is published quarterly, I have applied for an ISSN. It’s like an ISBN, but it’s specifically for “serials” -- publications that appear in a series at regular intervals. And the ISSN has a wonderful advantage over its well-known cousin: it’s available free of charge!

Meanwhile, after playing “word tennis” with most of the authors, we have arrived at mutually agreeable texts for all seventeen pieces planned for The Autumn Issue. Sixteen of the authors have returned their Flasher’s Agreements, noting any last minute adjustments to their texts or bios, and I have taken a “Flasher” photo for The Autumn Cover. So, I’m just waiting for the seventeenth agreement and our official ISSN number in order to publish and mail copies to subscribers.

And the 27 subscribers who have an annual subscription will receive a “bonus” with The Autumn Issue -- a copy of our first “chapbook” entitled “Not Quite Your Same Old Eden,” by KR Mullin -- a collection of nineteen stories about Adam, Eve, Snake ... and Grandmother?!?!

Originally, I thought this collection would be the first in a series of “books” by single authors, but then I realized that I’d need an ISBN number for each one, and, at $40 or more per book, I thought the cost would be prohibitive, especially on top of the copyright fee. Therefore, I’ve decided to launch a second “serial” in conjunction with A Flasher’s Dozen. Each issue of this second quarterly will contain a collection of works by a single author whose work has previously appeared in A Flasher’s Dozen. At the moment, I’m planning to call this quarterly “The Lone Flasher.” Then I’ll only need an ISSN number to make each issue “official.”

I’ve already gotten an agreement from my co-editor to collect some of her delightful Buck & Irma stories for the second Lone Flasher, which will be included with The Winter Issue when it’s sent to annual subscribers in November or December. Although she hasn’t decided on a title for her collection yet, the stories will be similar to the ones that can be found in The Trial Issue and The Autumn Issue.

Back issues of The Lone Flasher will be available for $7.50 each, so, if you think you might enjoy an extra helping of wit each quarter, I’d suggest that you become an annual subscriber to A Flasher’s Dozen for $15 and receive free copies of The Lone Flasher with your subscription. For subscription information, please click on the “Subscriptions & Submissions” entry in the list on the left side of this page.

And, if you’re interested in getting your flash fiction published elsewhere, I’d suggest you subscribe to Pam Castro’s free monthly newsletter, Flash Fiction Flash. All you have to do is send a blank e-mail to FlashFictionFlash-Subscribe@yahoogroups.com for lots of useful information about markets along with lists of places other subscribers have recently been published! This is an invaluable tool for writers who want to get published.

Thursday, July 07, 2005

Some Titles, Authors, & Opening Lines from The Autumn Issue

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First Skirmish
by Margaret B. Davidson, a widely published author in upstate New York.
"Bill had survived afternoon tea with my parents, seemingly unperturbed by the barrage of questions my mother had seen fit to hurl at him as to his life in America. Maybe he thought all English parents behaved in this fashion; maybe he thought he'd passed the test. I knew otherwise ..."

Coin-cidence
by Bruce Niedt, a "beneficent bureaucrat" and family man from South Jersey.
"I toss a quarter in the air, thinking about the opening scene of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead."

Tortilla
by Rebecca Wann, a Texan who takes computer science classes at night.
"I'm dying, and they give me a tortilla. I hate tortillas."

Flight
by Lori Romero, a writer living in New Mexico.
"My uncle bit the nurse taking his temperature. Not a gentle warning nip, but a full-on chomp, which left an imprint distinctive enough for forensic identification."

What Are These Wings For?
by Greg Beatty, has a PhD in English from the University of Iowa.
"The old man shifted on Dr. Percival's couch, moving just enough to allow his bedraggled wings to fan out from his shoulders."

The Persistence of Guilt
by C. S. Watts, an author from Pennsylvania.
"You don't discuss it with your friends thinking no one will understand. Spirituality is so personal. "

My Doppelganger
by Jack Goodstein, a retired professor of English in Western Pennsylvania.
"Goldstein has haunted me for years. From nowhere he comes. One minute he's there, the next? Who knows?"

The Chimes’ Legacy
by Wayne Scheer, a retired teacher living in Atlanta.
"Harry Chimes had made a lifestyle of avoiding confrontation. Today, he felt bothered by it."

The Seventh Grade Party
by Bruce DuBoff, a Library Media Specialist in Southern New Jersey.
“The party was at David Gee's because his records covered all the hits the narcissistic '70's could muster.“

Define “Human"
by Heather Wardell, a former elementary school teacher living in Ontario.
“I recognize the senator immediately, even though I haven't seen him for nearly fifteen years.”

Pay Day
by Sandra Seamans, a retired farmwife from Pennsylvania who loves to write.
"I grabbed Pinky Blue by the shoulder and spun him around, 'What the hell did you say?''"

Sharing Space
by Carol Carpenter, a former college writing instructor in Michigan.
"Sam told Rachel that he had to work late and wouldn't be able to see her. She chuckled."

The Ruby Red Slippers
by Tom Campbell, an Oregonian who hopes to find a career before he retires.
"A pair of ruby red slippers lay abandoned and half hidden beside the yellow brick road. A teenage girl came plodding along ...”

Gray Day, 1993
by Samuel Weldon, a might-have-been lawyer hiding out in Saskatoon.
“I’d met Tiffany at The Legal Eagle, and, encumbered with alimony payments instead of a spouse, I’d invited her on a picnic.”

And She Was Not to Blame
by Kelsey Wolfram, a young writer from Georgia.
“Caroline watched her spoiled nephew dribble his applesauce all over his face and in disgust turned to her grandmother, hoping that age would offer some sign of dignity. Instead, the image mirrored that of the baby.”

Bed of Roses
by Pam Skochinski, a technical writer on sabbatical in California.
“Roger couldn’t stop looking out his kitchen window. Only one day to go.”

Any Port in a Storm
by Ann Vitale, an aspiring writer of fiction living in Pennsylvania
“Viv leaned out the car window, listening to the rear tire of the Crown Victoria sing as it spun on the patch of ice in the gutter.”

Saturday, July 02, 2005

At The Autumn Issue Deadline

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We received 28 submissions for The Autumn Issue, including seven from authors whose work appeared in The Trial Issue. Seven submissions came from PA, three from NJ, two each from Canada, CA, GA, and NY, and one each from Australia, AL, IL MA, MI, NM, OR, SC, TX, and WA. Eight of the submissions arrived during the final week.

Unfortunately, we’ve had to release five of the submissions back to their respective authors; in each case, we explained why we’d decided not to publish the piece and gave suggestions on how we thought it might be improved. One of the submissions that we released from The Trial Issue had been edited and re-submitted to The Autumn Issue, and we're considering it for The Autumn Issue.

We’ve sent out mock-ups to seven of the authors for final approval of their printed texts, and we’ve sent editorial suggestions to three other authors. Some Titles, Authors, and Opening Lines from The Autumn Issue will appear in the next blog.

We currently have twenty one-year subscribers, and each of them will receive not only a copy of The Autumn Issue but also a copy of “Not Quite Your Same Old Eden,” our first attempt at publishing a single-author chapbook of Flash Fiction. We’re also planning a second chapbook to accompany The Winter Issue, making the one-year subscription an excellent bargain, especially if we find chapbook-worthy collections of Flash Fiction for the Spring and Summer Issues. To learn about subscribing, just click on the “Subscriptions and Submissions” entry in the column to the left. And, if you subscribe by August 1, we’ll include a complimentary copy of The Trial Issue at no additional cost. That’s at least seven collections of Flash Fiction, over 90 stories for $15. Unbeatable!

Questions, comments, and suggestions can be sent to KR Mullin at krm6343@yahoo.com We’ll gladly accept submissions for The Winter Issue as long as you follow the guidelines%

Sunday, June 19, 2005

Learning as I Go

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Someone pointed out a serious oversight on The Trial Issue: I forgot to get a copyright! Fortunately, I was able to take care of this problem last Monday by re-designing the cover to include a “(Copyright Symbol) 2005 by KR Mullin for the authors.” Of course, I also had to complete the forms and send two copies with a check for $30 to the Library of Congress.

While preparing for this action, I thought I should investigate the possibility of including an ISBN number to make it truly official! However, 10 ISBN numbers cost $225, and that doesn’t include an additional $230 for the matching bar codes. Of course, one cannot actually GET printed bar codes for that price; one either needs a bar code printer or one has to pay a middleman to print the bar codes. Fortunately, ISBN numbers and bar codes are not required on serials, especially if one is not intending to market them through a bookstore. Alas, when I bring out the first “chapbook” in September, I’ll have to tack on another $45.50 expenditure per book.

Meanwhile, how much have I already spent on this project?

Labels and Envelopes............$30.57
Paper.....................................38.16
Postage..................................34.25
Copyright...............................30.00
Laser Copying Equipment ....... ??.??
Time (Editing, Copying, etc)...... ?.??
-------------------------------------------
Expenditures to Date............132.98

PayPal Receipts......................$30.00
PayPal Fees............................ -1.48
Checks...................................20.00
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Income...................................48.52

Profit / (Loss)........................(84.46)

Saturday, June 04, 2005

My Birthday Update

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June Third is the birthday of Allen Ginsburg, Jefferson Davis, and me. And my wife gave me the perfect present: a toner cartridge for my laser copier so that I can keep producing A Flasher’s Dozen!

A BACKWARD GLANCE: A bouquet of thanks to E. N. Taylor for his kind words about A Flasher’s Dozen at his website ( http://au.geocities.com/en_taylor/ ).

WHERE WE’RE STANDING: We now have 17 one-year subscribers! And we’ve received seven submissions for The Autumn Issue; only two of these submitting authors appeared in The Trial Issue. Here are The Autumn Issue dates to remember:

7/1 Deadline for Autumn Issue submissions
8/1 Last day for us to accept or release submissions
9/1 Publication of The Autumn Issue

WHAT’S AHEAD: I thought that someday I might consider branching out into the production of single-author chapbooks. At 1:30am Tuesday morning, I decided that the time is now! Therefore, I will serve as the official Guinea Pig by assembling a collection of my Adam-and-Eve stories into a 30-or-so-page chapbook which I will send with The Autumn Issue to everyone who has a one-year subscription (currently 17 people). My co-editor Sandra thinks that she can have a similar set of Buck-and-Irma stories ready to accompany The Winter Issue when it comes out in December.

Any author whose work appears in The Trial Issue or The Autumn Issue may propose a suitable chapbook to be included with The Spring Issue. Proposals for The Spring Chapbook will be accepted after November 1. Here’s my current distribution plan, obviously subject to change if I discover any problems in the process: Each chapbook will bear a $7.50 price marker and will be given away with subscription issues or sold for $5.00 each. Authors will receive $1 for each book that is given away with a subscription issue and $2 for each chapbook sold separately. Authors may also buy copies for $3 each (for 10 or fewer copies) or $2 each (plus bulk postage) when ordering more than 10 copies. Any thoughts about this plan ... or about any other aspect of A Flasher’s Dozen, please drop me a line: krm6343@yahoo.com

Thursday, May 19, 2005

Getting the Word Out

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Last week was an activity-drenched river of days. First, I was delighted to learn that the next issue of Paragraph, one of the pioneers of micro-literature, will include two pieces by me -- a great opportunity to publicize A Flasher’s Dozen.

In search of publicity, I sent a copy of The Trial Issue to Small Press Review and would like to send a copy to Pam Castro in the hope that she’ll mention it in a forthcoming issue of Flash Fiction Flash (to get a free subscription, go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FlashFictionFlash ). If anyone has suggestions of other places to get reviewed, please drop me a line: krm6343@yahoo.com .

However, I not only need publicity, I need authors, so I went looking for some firmly established authors for whom I could find mailing addresses, and I sent them copies of The Trial Issue. Although it’s unlikely that any of them will actually send anything, there’s always the chance that one of them might take pity on a literary upstart!

Then I drove across Pennsylvania to attend the annual Pennwriter’s conference. This is a diverse group of writers whose conferences not only offer a decent set of lectures and other writerly activities but also provide access to some prestigious editors and agents. Many Pennwriters are published -- primarily in romance and mystery, it seems to me -- and many members reside beyond the borders of Pennsylvania. In fact, two of the three Pennwriters in The Trial Issue are from Area Seven (ie, outside the six regions of Pennsylvania). If you’d like to learn more, go to http://pennwriters.org/ . At the Pittsburgh meeting, I not only gave copies of The Trial Issue to a dozen prospective authors but also pitched my latest collection of short short stories to a couple agents. Unfortunately, “nobody’s buying short story collections right now,” so it’ll be a while before you’ll be able to read all my tales of Adam and Eve.

When I returned home, I found that I’d received my first subscription check, and it came from a very symbolic source: Irv Pliskin, the man who introduced me to Flash Fiction in the summer of 2002 and the host of the FlashXer list -- a free, online exercise group (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FlashXer)

Sunday, May 08, 2005

Subscriptions & Submissions

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Having completed the layout and printed a copy of The Trial Issue, I began duplicating, folding, stapling, and trimming the pages into chapbooks. I then printed address labels and stuffed manila envelopes: two copies to each of the fifteen authors and one copy to each author whose submission had not been accepted. The total postage to Canada, Australia, Mexico, and Wales as well as eight of the United States was $33.15.

Now ... here's how to Subscribe and Submit your work to A Flasher's Dozen -- a 20-30 page quarterly chapbook containing 13-17 pieces of Flash Lit.

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An annual subscription is $15 for four issues (plus $8 postage for non-residents of the US). We also offer a Next Issue Subscription for $5.00 (plus $2 postage for non-residents).

Subscriptions may be paid through PayPal to krm6343@yahoo.com or by check payable to KR Mullin, PO Box 112, Mantua, NJ 08051-0112.

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We pay $15 per published story for submissions from subscribers. Non-subscribers will be paid two copies of the issue in which their work appears. No one should submit more than one piece per issue. "Next Issue" subscribers may submit one piece before receiving the issue and another piece after receiving the issue.

The submission should be pasted into an e-mail and sent to krm6343@yahoo.com
The Subject Line should read Winter Issue: Your Story Title.

Deadlines are:
10/1/05 (for the Winter Issue)
01/1/06 (for the Spring Issue)
04/1/06 (for the Summer Issue)
07/1/06 (for the Autumn issue)

Each subscriber whose work is published will receive a check for $15, an extra copy of the issue in which the work appears, and a one-issue subscription extension.

Submissions may be fiction or memoir in any genre or combination of genres; they may be cleverly surreal or humorously absurd; they may even be prose poetry. But they must contain narrative elements, and they must display some form of wit -- cleverness, paradox, subtlety, irony, epiphany, or even enigmas gift-wrapped in conundrums.

Because The Winter Issue will officially be The Second Issue, stories about Seconds, Second-hand Items, or Second Sight will be particularly welcome though not required.

Works containing gratuitous violence, prurient sex, or censorable language should be submitted elsewhere.

Submissions must contain between 55 and 999 words. Authors must include: (1) a mailing address and (2) a brief biography to be published in the issue (including personal website information if desired). Also, non-subscribers must state that they realize they'll only receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears.

Please do not send material that has been submitted or published elsewhere. All rights revert to the author after publication.

Sunday, May 01, 2005

Summer Issue Authors

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Randall Brown lives near Philadelphia. He’s a fiction editor with SmokeLong Quarterly, an MFA candidate at Vermont College, and a recipient of a 2004 Pushcart nomination. Work has appeared or is forthcoming in a number of journals, including The Iconoclast, Ink Pot, The MacGuffin, Timber Creek Review, Mouseion, and Del Sol Review. Electronic samples of his work can be accessed through http://flashesinthepan.blogspot.com/

Julie Ann Cook is a "Yankee gone southern.” She currently resides in South Carolina with her wonderful husband and beautiful baby boy. While graphic design helps to pay the bills, poetry and painting are her true careers. A member of pathetic.org, her poetry has recently appeared in Thrift Poetic Arts Journal. Her e-designs, poetry, and family photographs can be found at www.artjewl.com .

Margaret B. Davidson, born and raised in England, now resides in upstate New York. She has over two hundred short stories published in small press print and online magazines. Margaret's husband provides moral support for her writing endeavors while her cat helps with the typing. She may be reached at MargaretDa@aol.com.

Larry Kimport oversees an Alternative Education high school program serving at-risk teens in suburban New Jersey, and he coaches wrestling. He’s married with two children. He belongs to Pennwriters and enjoys writing.

Karen Martinson lives in Chicago with her cats, goes to school by day, and waits tables at night. Although she has several notebooks filled with scribblings, “Conviction” is her first submission ... and her first publication credit.

KR Mullin lives in South Jersey and works fulltime in a hospital. He is a member of Pennwriters, FlashXer, and several internet writer’s groups. His fiction has appeared in Inkburns, Inkspin, Green Tricycle, Literary Potpourri, The First Line, Planet Relish, Long Story Short, and Flashshot: Year One. He is co-editor of A Flasher’s Dozen.

William B. Naylor has been telling stories for most of his life. In the second grade. his flash version of Jack and Jill as well as a when-I-grow-up-I-wanna-be-a composition were posted in the main hall of the school along with the work of the rest of the rocket surgeons. If you want to see more of his work and his yet-to-be-published ‘My Tiny Book of Days’ check out http://www.fanstory.com/selectprofileportfolio.jsp?userid=68898

Bruce Niedt is a "beneficent bureaucrat" and family man from South Jersey who began writing seriously again about six years ago. Since then his work has appeared in Writers Journal, Mad Poets Review, Edison Literary Review, and miller's pond. He won the ByLine Magazine 2003 Short Fiction and Poetry Prize and has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. He helps administrate the poetry community at Pathetic.org .

Sharon Poppen was fascinated with fiction as a child. She created storylines for neighborhood girls playing Barbies and wrote sequels to her latest book or cinema experience. Retired from the communications industry, she now draws inspiration from the mysterious mountains, flowing Colorado River, and ever-shifting desert sands of Western Arizona. Her novel 'After the War, Before the Peace' is available at www.Xlibris.com/sharonpoppen, and her western serial 'Hannah' is available at www.keepitcoming.net, Her website is www.havasuwriters.com .

Sandra Seamans is a retired farmwife who loves to write. Her short fiction has been published in Writers Open Forum, PA Sportsman, Short Stuff, and Christopher Gooch Emystery Ezine. She is co-editor of A Flasher’s Dozen.

Darren Swift is 39 and married with three children. He has traveled the world for 23 years but has recently decided to settle down in Wales. He is currently working on the tenth re-write of a second rate novel which he hopes to get published, sell 10 copies and retire from public life as a semi-success. He is proud to be a contributor to www.writersagainstwar.com . The rest of his bad writing can be found at www.pathetic.org .

E. N. Taylor lives in Western Australia. His first novel was published in 2003, and he is currently at work on several others. For more information, you can point and click your way to http://au.geocities.com/en_taylor .

G. W. Thomas lives in British Columbia, Canada. His work has appeared in over 350 books, magazines and ezines including Writer's Digest, Flesh & Blood, and Black October Magazine. He is editor/publisher of RAGE m a c h i n e Books. http://gwauthor21.tripod.com

Ann Vitale has always been an avid reader and aspired to write fiction. She has written a newspaper series on dog training, a training manual, and she’s ghost written speeches. Fiction, her inner writer screamed. She wrote three books for an educational press. Fiction, the voiced insisted. So, from her farm in Pennsylvania where she is working on a novel, she submitted this, her first published work of fiction.

Samuel Weldon is an old codger from Saskatoon who thrives on the memories of days-gone-by whenever winter hides the future under white drifts. Some of his best work has appeared on Bathroom Stalls and Fast Food Napkins.

Sunday, April 24, 2005

Titles and Authors in the Summer Issue

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Conviction
by Karen Martinson (Illinois)

When More than Innocence is Lost
by Darren Swift (Wales)

My Trial Date
by William B. Naylor (Nova Scotia)

Double Jeopardy
by Margaret B. Davidson (New York)

The Spear of the Gods
by E. N. Taylor (Australia)

Star Witness
by Sandra Seamans (Pennsylvania)

An Accidental Misfortune
by KR Mullin (New Jersey)

Shed Skin and Ashes
by Julie Ann Cook (South Carolina)

Rewarding Appreciation
by Sharon Poppen (Arizona)

The Bunny and the Hare
by Bruce Niedt (New Jersey)

Braids (for my wife)
by Samuel Weldon (Saskatchewan)

The Poet Laureate of Potter County
by Randall Brown (Pennsylvania)

Peerless
by Ann Vitale (Pennsylvania)

The Smile
by G. W. Thomas (British Columbia)

Passengers
by Larry Kimport (New Jersey)

Thursday, April 21, 2005

Filling the Final Two Spots in The Trial Issue

*
I was in New Orleans last week to attend a work-related conference. When I returned, I had to choose two of the final four submissions to complete The Trial Issue. I chose

“The Smile,” an advertising satire by G. W. Thomas, a widely published author from British Columbia

and

“Peerless,” a tale of two art critics by Ann Vitale, a Pennsylvania writer who hasn’t previously had any fiction published

Also, I’ve decided to continue publishing A Flasher’s Dozen, and I’m delighted that Sandra Seamans has agreed to continue serving as co-editor. Because the project will continue, each of the fifteen authors in The Trial Issue will receive a complimentary one-year subscription.

If anyone is interested in receiving a copy of The Trial Issue, just send your mailing address to krm6343@yahoo.com and, if I don’t get overwhelmed with requests, I’ll mail you one when I finish copying, folding, stapling, and trimming it.

I’ll be accepting submissions for the September Issue beginning on June 1, and I’ll publish the new submission guidelines at that time.

Saturday, April 09, 2005

Three Acceptances, One Release, Two Spots to Fill

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I’d gotten an e-mail from Eileen D’Angelo. She’s the spark who keeps the Mad Poets group burning brightly in the Delaware Valley. She’d contacted one of the poets whose work will appear in the next issue of Mad Poets Review and learned that he writes Flash Fiction. His name is Randall Brown, and I’d read a fantastic story by him in Ink Pot last year, so I told him about The Trial Issue. He sent us “The Poet Laureate of Potter County,” and we accepted it. It’s about an “award-winning poet” who writes poems on request for his neighbors.

We also accepted two other pieces:

“Braids” by Samuel Weldon, a nice piece about a guy who likes long hair, and
“Passengers” by Larry Kimport, an interesting study of a guy and some of the hitchhikers he picks up.

We sent mock-ups and contracts to all three authors.

Then we released one of the pieces we’d been holding, leaving us with four available pieces and two empty berths in The Trial Issue.

Unfortunately, I’ll be at a work-related conference from the 10th to the 15th, so the final decision will have to be on hold until I get back.

Sunday, April 03, 2005

The Submission Deadline Has Come and Gone

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April 1st was the deadline for submissions to The Trial Issue of A Flasher’s Dozen.

The next deadline is May 2nd, the date by which we’ll have either accepted or released all of the 26 submissions that we received.

So far, we’ve accepted ten and released nine. That leaves us with seven stories in the “holding bin,” and it means that we’ll have to make some tough decisions during the final pare-down. We need at least thirteen stories to make a “flasher’s dozen.” I’d originally planned to include fifteen, but I’d been expecting to receive shorter pieces, and I’m not sure how many pieces I can actually cram into a sensibly sized chapbook, even using a small-font type.

Once we’ve chosen the submissions, we’ll need the paper to print it on. Toward this end, I purchased some Cover Stock at Staples last month, but it wasn’t compatible with my Laser Copier, so the print tended to smudge. Therefore, I’d needed to find Laser-friendly Cover Stock with matching 24lb text paper.

Recently Office Max had a special “brown-bag sale” in which shoppers received 15% off of all the items they could fit into an old-fashioned paper grocery bag. I spent a long time in their paper aisle trying to select the best paper I could afford. I ended up with a white stock that contained tiny, multicolored confetti randomly deposited on the surface. It was kind of cute in a celebratory way. Unfortunately, the confetti tended to “distort” the letters by adding unexpected blobs to the small font I was using, and I was disappointed with the results in spite of reassurances from several people who examined a mock-up of the first ten stories.

So, on the first Sunday in April, while searching for a new space heater to replace the one that died last week (“Sorry, but that’s a seasonal item!”) and a new outdoor lamp to replace the one that had been broken by an overly efficient snowplow last month, we stopped into a Staples and were able to locate and purchase some elegant Ivory Cover Stock as well as similarly hued 24lb text paper. Now, I’ve got the paper, the copier (a Christmas present from my wife), the saddle stapler, and the paper trimmer. Hence, I’m physically ready to produce The Trial Issue.

Tuesday, March 29, 2005

Only One Submission This Week

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Although we only received one submission this week--or maybe because of that--we’re holding three of our March submissions. Four of the other submissions were returned to their authors with explanations, comments, suggestions, and/or thorough critiques.

The new submission came from South Montrose, PA, but without bio or information about how the author learned about us. An article about us appeared in the latest Penn Writers newsletter, so my guess is that this author learned of our existence from that article. However, I’ve also done quite a few readings in PA, so one of those may have triggered the submission.

In any case, I’m pretty sure that we’ll have enough decent pieces to make The Trial Issue a worthwhile chapbook. The only question is: should I continue publishing A Flasher’s Dozen? Once I start paying the authors*, the number of submissions may increase dramatically. However, if I only accept submissions from subscribers, will submissions be underwhelming?

Well, the debate rages in my mind, but I don’t have to decide until May, so, to paraphrase Scarlet O’Hara, I’ll worry about that next month!

__________
*I’ve been thinking I might pay $10 or $20 per piece, so I’ll probably compromise at $15. That would mean I’d have to sink about $200 into each issue before I even buy the paper or the stamps and envelopes. If a single copy costs $7.50, I’d need at least 26 single-copy subscribers just to pay my authors. On a yearly basis, however, I’d need 40 annual subscriptions (@ $20/year) to cover my author fees. Is that a reasonable expectation? I’ll be giving away over a dozen annual subscriptions to all the authors in The Trial Issue, so that will undercut my potential subscriber base before I’d even start looking. Yikes, editing and publishing is no picnic, is it?

Sunday, March 20, 2005

Our Ninth and Tenth Acceptances

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This week we accepted two submissions:

1. “Rewarding Appreciation” by Sharon Poppen, our fifth acceptance from members of the FlashXer list (To join, send a blank email message to FlashXer-Subscribe@yahoogroups.com Administrator: Irv Pliskin)

2. “Shed Skin and Ashes” by Julie Ann Cook, our third acceptance from members of Pathetic.org, a community of 1000 poets and poetry enthusiasts.

We’ve also accepted two pieces from members of the Flashshot list, bringing our total acceptances to ten.

Originally I’d planned to include thirteen to fifteen pieces in each Flasher’s Dozen. But then I thought that, because Flash is shorter than “normal” short stories, maybe A Flasher’s Dozen should only contain eleven pieces. An unexpected factor may force me to move in that shorter direction: so many of the submissions have been in the 900-word range that the final book may be too thick for the stapled, chapbook format I’d originally intended. Apparently an editor must also be a tightrope walker!

This week, we received 5 more submissions -- from Cherry Hill (NJ), Lumberton (NJ), Whittier (CA), Port Moody (BC, Canada), and Marietta (GA), and we released two submissions back to their authors. I felt particularly bad about one of the rejections because the author was quite young, and I hated to discourage her when the problem was not with her writing but with the form of the story. In my rejection letter, I tried to explain the situation, and she was kind enough to write back and thank me. I hope that I'll decide to continue publishing A Flasher's Dozen after The Trial Issue because I expect her to become an excellent writer, and I want to publish her work.

Sunday, March 13, 2005

One More Acceptance, One More Submission

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We accepted “The Bunny and the Hare” from Bruce Niedt (a "beneficent bureaucrat" from South Jersey), and we received one submission from the Main Line (west of Philadelphia, PA).

Otherwise, it’s been a slow week for A Flasher’s Dozen. I took the opportunity to mock up the accepted submissions. The first eight stories currently fill twenty pages; reformatting may be necessary.

So far I’ve promoted A Flasher’s Dozen through two on-line writing groups and have accepted pieces from both groups, but none of these members has yet published a “hooray.” This is disappointing because I expected “hoorays” to generate more submissions. I’ve also had a piece about The Trial Issue published in the quarterly newsletter of Penn Writers, a state-wide writing group in Pennsylvania, and I’ve distributed flyers to three other groups in Pennsylvania as well as two writing groups in New Jersey. This Wednesday I’ll distribute flyers to a third writing group in New Jersey. Nevertheless, most of the submissions and almost half of the acceptances have come from writers outside the United States. Perhaps the problem is that the local groups are composed of writers whose main interest is either poetry or novel-writing whereas Flash Fiction is an art practiced outside the US.

Sunday, March 06, 2005

4 More Submissions, 4 More Acceptances, 4 More Weeks.

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During the past week, we've received stories from New York State, British Columbia, and Ontario as well as from someone who included neither a biography nor an address.

Meanwhile, we've accepted four submissions:

E. N. Taylor (Western Australia) thought our editorial suggestions "made a lot of sense" and edited accordingly, so we accepted "The Spear of the Gods."

Karen Martinson (Chicago) changed her title to "Conviction," and we accepted it.

Darren Swift (Wales) "tidied up" his submission, "When More Than Innocence is Lost," and we accepted it.

Will Naylor (Nova Scotia) thought our suggestions were "very reasonable," so we accepted "My Trial Date."

... and that brings our total acceptances to seven with only four weeks remaining until our deadline.

Next step: mock up each accepted submission and send it to the author for final approval. On the back of the mock-up, I plan to include a simple contract:

"My signature below indicates that I have reviewed the printed text of my submission as it will appear in _A Flasher's Dozen_, that I have indicated in ink any changes that should be made before publication, and that I approve the text, as amended, for publication. My signature further guarantees that I am the author of this submission and that I have the right to allow its publication. By my signature, I grant _A Flasher's Dozen_ first serial rights to my submission in exchange for two copies of 'The Trial Issue' with the understanding that all rights to my submission revert to me after publication. If I publish this submission elsewhere, I will cite _A Flasher's Dozen_ as the original publisher."

Friday, February 25, 2005

1 Acceptance, 2 Releases, 3 Submissions, 4 Almosts

After a complete review of all seven submissions to A Flasher's Dozen, we're proud to announce our very first acceptance:

"Double Jeopardy" by Margaret B. Davidson (Born and raised in England, she now resides in upstate New York)

To help fill the Trial Issue with Trials, we co-editors will each make a contribution:

"A Star in the Witness Box" by Sandra Seamans (A retired farmwife living in upstate Pennsylvania)

"The Accidental Misfortune" by KR Mullin (A hospital-based Tumor Registrar working in South Jersey)

There were four other submissions that we liked almost enough to accept; these we returned to their respective authors with editorial suggestions on how they could win our literary affections. Unfortunately, we released two other selections back to their authors in hopes that they will find other homes. Now we're reviewing our three latest submissions, all from members of pathetic.com, an on-line poetry community. If things go well, we'll soon have our Trial Issue half full!

Sunday, February 20, 2005

A Few More Submissions Arrive

We've received three more submissions this week. A very short piece from Chicago, a piece with a nice, surprise ending from Wales, and a fable from South Jersey. The last two of the pieces are a direct result of my having presented a talk entitled "The Joy of Flashing" at the Barnes & Noble in Marlton, NJ. I distributed a chapbook that I'd put together for the occasion; it included some history and examples of Flash Fiction as well as a list of websites that publish Flash Fiction and, of course, an ad for A Flasher's Dozen. One of the attendees helps administrate pathetic.org, an online poetry community. The author in Wales is a member of that group. Although I liked most of his submission, I asked him if he'd consider some editorial suggestions, and he said, "Yes." So I "critted" his submission and returned it to him.

It will soon be a month since we started receiving submissions, and we only have nine so far! Nevertheless, it's probably time to make decisions on which ones to keep and which to release. The "necessity" of this action is partially motivated by an experience I had this week. I emailed an inquiry about a piece I'd submitted to a journal last November and was informed that, since they hadn't replied within 90 days, I should consider it a rejection. With the simplicity of the e-mail "reply" button, I think that such an attitude is patently unfair to authors, and I won't be sending any more pieces to that publication. I certainly hope that A Flasher's Dozen, if it becomes a quarterly, will be far more author-friendly.

Sunday, February 13, 2005

A Few More Submissions Trickle In

I've been in a bit of a funk lately, and I think it's partly due to this publishing project. Although I've been announcing my plans to flash-oriented groups on the internet as well as at public readings in the area, I've been amazed and depressed by the lack of submissions. Many publications complain about the thousands of submissions they have to plow through in order to select one or two for publication. I, on the other hand, want to put together a collection of 13 to 15 pieces but haven't even received half that many.

Nevertheless, I'm strangely intimidated by the pieces that I've gotten. Are they as good as I think they are? Am I fit to judge them? Is it possible that I'll receive something even better when the floodgates open and I'm inundated by millions of submissions?

To be certain that I don't misjudge a submission, I've asked Sandra Seamans to be my co-editor. Although I've never met her in person, I've always enjoyed the responses that she's produced to the prompts on FlashXer, and I've received a lot of level-headed and helpful criticism from her on my responses, so I think we'll make a good team.

Now all we need are enough submissions to judge! I've been thinking that part of the problem may be the restrictive requirement that submissions contain certain words or that preference will be given to works about a particular topic. Therefore, I've decided to eliminate those elements from the guidelines, and you can write about anything you want! So ... why not send us something wittily whimsical, eclectically entertaining, mischievously mythical, and/or scintillatingly snappy?

Sunday, January 30, 2005

The First Submissions

Since announcing my intention to publish, I've received four (actually five) submissions. The first arrived from Mexico, and I suggested some changes. However, the author decided to withdraw it and to submit a different piece. I liked it better, but I hesitate to make any acceptances this early in the game.

The second arrived from Nova Scotia, an entertaining 55er that's definitely worth considering.

The third arrived from New York. Again I made some suggestions for changes, and the author took the opportunity to do an overhaul, producing a much stronger piece (in my opinion).

The fourth arrived from Australia, enlarging my opportunity for producing a multi-national publication.

When I was formulating my plans, however, I hadn't considered the cost of international mailing. Now it looks as if that may be a factor because 75% of the submissions so far have come from outside the United States!

Meanwhile, I've made an Excel spreadsheet to keep track of submissions, including date of submission, author's mailing address, e-mail address, title of submission, word count, and disposition. I've also modified my guidelines, asking authors to let me know how they heard about my Trial Issue so that I can include that information on my chart as well.

And I've submitted two pieces for publication this week, thereby providing an opportunity to get the word out by including a reference to the Trial Issue in my bio.

Thursday, January 27, 2005

Getting the Word Out

Tonight I took a big step toward starting this quarterly by sending a New Market announcement to two of the Flash groups that I belong to -- FlashXers (a Flash Exercise group that provides three prompts per week as well as feedback on submissions) and Flashshot (the discussion group of writers whose work appears in the daily Flashshot). Each of these groups contains numerous prolific and talented writers of the Flash persuasion, so I probably shouldn't have been surprised when, less than 20 minutes after sending my notification, I received my first submission ... from Mexico! Ain't this a wonderful world?

I also sent a notice to Madpoets (a writing group that organizes and advertises readings throughout the Delaware Valley); they've signed me up for a readng at the Barnes & Noble in Bryn Mawr, PA, on July 7.

And I'll be "lecturing " on Flash Fiction at the Barnes & Noble in Marlton, NJ, on February 14, a presentation that I'm calling "The Joy of Flashing."

Monday, January 24, 2005

Submission Guidelines

Hi,

My name is Ken Mullin. I enjoy writing Flash Fiction, and I've been thinking about starting my own Flash Fiction quarterly. However, to find out how much time and money I'd have to invest in such a project, I intend to begin with a Trial Issue.

I've chosen the title for my publication, A Flasher's Dozen, and expect to include 13 to 15 pieces of Flash (approximately 24-40 5x8" pages).

Submissions may be fiction or memoir in any genre or combination of genres; they may be cleverly surreal or humorously absurd; they may even be prose poetry. But they must contain narrative elements, and they must display some form of wit -- cleverness, paradox, subtlety, irony, epiphany, enigmas enwrapped in conundrums, etc.

Submissions must contain between 55 and 999 words, preferably about 500.

Works containing gratuitous violence, prurient sex, or censorable language should be submitted elsewhere.

Authors should include: (1) a mailing address to receive a copy of the issue, (2) a brief biography to be published in the issue, including a personal website if desired, and (3) information about how they heard about this Trial Issue.

Submissions will be limited to one per author; all rights revert to the author after publication. Please do not send material that has been submitted or published elsewhere.

Authors whose stories are accepted for the Trial Issue will receive 2 copies. If I decide to continue publishing, they will also receive a complimentary four-issue subscription, probably about a $20 value.

Deadline for the Trial Issue will be on or before April 1st; notification of acceptance or rejection will occur by May 2nd; and publication will take place on or before June 3rd. When15 pieces have been accepted, the issue will close.

Submissions should be sent within an e-mail (no attachments) to krm6343@yahoo,com; the Subject Line should begin "Trial Issue:" (without the quotes) followed by the title of the submission.