Thursday, May 19, 2005

Getting the Word Out

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Last week was an activity-drenched river of days. First, I was delighted to learn that the next issue of Paragraph, one of the pioneers of micro-literature, will include two pieces by me -- a great opportunity to publicize A Flasher’s Dozen.

In search of publicity, I sent a copy of The Trial Issue to Small Press Review and would like to send a copy to Pam Castro in the hope that she’ll mention it in a forthcoming issue of Flash Fiction Flash (to get a free subscription, go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FlashFictionFlash ). If anyone has suggestions of other places to get reviewed, please drop me a line: krm6343@yahoo.com .

However, I not only need publicity, I need authors, so I went looking for some firmly established authors for whom I could find mailing addresses, and I sent them copies of The Trial Issue. Although it’s unlikely that any of them will actually send anything, there’s always the chance that one of them might take pity on a literary upstart!

Then I drove across Pennsylvania to attend the annual Pennwriter’s conference. This is a diverse group of writers whose conferences not only offer a decent set of lectures and other writerly activities but also provide access to some prestigious editors and agents. Many Pennwriters are published -- primarily in romance and mystery, it seems to me -- and many members reside beyond the borders of Pennsylvania. In fact, two of the three Pennwriters in The Trial Issue are from Area Seven (ie, outside the six regions of Pennsylvania). If you’d like to learn more, go to http://pennwriters.org/ . At the Pittsburgh meeting, I not only gave copies of The Trial Issue to a dozen prospective authors but also pitched my latest collection of short short stories to a couple agents. Unfortunately, “nobody’s buying short story collections right now,” so it’ll be a while before you’ll be able to read all my tales of Adam and Eve.

When I returned home, I found that I’d received my first subscription check, and it came from a very symbolic source: Irv Pliskin, the man who introduced me to Flash Fiction in the summer of 2002 and the host of the FlashXer list -- a free, online exercise group (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FlashXer)